Jeremy Hunt cuts NICs again in the Spring Budget - News Article London : M Zaidi & Co

Jeremy Hunt cuts NICs again in the Spring Budget

The Chancellor made further changes to National Insurance contributions (NICs) following the cuts made in the Autumn Statement 2023.

The Chancellor made further changes to National Insurance contributions (NICs) following the cuts made in the Autumn Statement 2023. The rates for NICs will be cut by two percentage points for both employees and the self-employed from 6 April 2024.

This will see Class 1 employee NICs reduced from 10% to 8% from 6 April 2024, down from 12% at the end of last year. Meanwhile, Class 4 self-employed NICs are cut from 9% to 6% from 6 April 2024.

Mr Hunt made a number of other changes that will relieve the tax burden on businesses, families and motorists. He cut the higher rate of capital gains tax on residential property disposals from 28% to 24%. The lower rate will remain at 18% for any gains that fall within an individual's basic rate band.

The threshold for VAT registration will be lifted from £85,000 to £90,000 from 1 April 2024. According to the government, this will mean 28,000 businesses will no longer be VAT registered in 2024/25.

The Budget saw the creation of a new ISA that will allow people to invest in UK-focused assets. The new UK ISA creates an allowance of £5,000. This will be in addition to the £20,000 that can be subscribed into an ISA. The government will consult on the details.

The Chancellor made his cut to NICs possible with a series of tax raising measures. These include the abolition of the Furnished Holiday Lettings regime and Multiple Dwellings Relief, alongside a new duty on vaping and an increase in tobacco duty.

The UK's tax rules for non-UK domiciled individuals will be replaced with a residence-based regime that Mr Hunt says will raise £2.7 billion in revenue.

This new regime will commence on 6 April 2025 and applies UK-wide. Individuals who opt in to the new regime will be exempt from UK tax on foreign income and gains for their first four years of residence in the UK, while the government will make transitional arrangements for existing non-doms.

Internet link: HM Treasury press release